Monday, 19 February 2018

Mail art using your pen holder





Hi everyone. It's Verity here from Pretty Little Button bringing you another project. Today I've created a fun project using the pen holder from Silhouette. Mail art is quite popular, and many crafters also use their machines in conjunction with weddings, whether its your own, a family member or a friend. So, today I am showing you how to add some beautiful decoration to your envelopes without having to pick up a pen, other than to put it in the pen holder!

Mail art using Silhouette Pen Holder details:

To start off, find a design from the store and download this. I used a selection of floral bouquets from . I thought these would look beautiful on an envelope. The outline would provide beautiful decoration without overpowering the envelope.

In the design panel, I drew an oblong that measured the same size as my envelope. I also drew a small oblong in the centre of the envelope so I would remember to leave this space blank to write an address. Once I had my 'envelope' in my design panel, I added the floral design I downloaded from the store. I resized and rotated the designs until I was happy with the layout.

To prevent the envelope lines intersecting the floral designs and to avoid these being drawn along with the design that expands the edge of the envelope I cropped the image. This will ensure the pen won't draw of the envelope and onto my mat.


However, as you can see from the photo above, there is a still a line denoting the edge of the envelope where no design intersects. This isn't too much of a problem, however I didn't want my pen to draw this either. An easy quick fix is by using the 'knife' tool. Once I had selected the knife, I just drew along the outside edge of the 'envelope panel' from one corner to another. This removes any straight lines of the edges of the flower.


With the design as above, I was ready to draw this out. I selected 'copy paper' as my medium and 'sketch' as the action. From the toll drop down, make sure you select 'pen holder' as opposed to sketch pen. I used two different pens for these envelopes, one a gel pen and another Staedtler Triplus Fineliner. I used large 'white' thread for the gel pen and the medium 'grey' thread for the fineliner.

Now, when you come to send your project to draw, I would practice on a scrap of white paper. If the pen nib is poking out the bottom of the pen holder too much, you could get drag lines on your project, as seen below. Now I had made sure this was just right by doing a test run, and this didn't happen until the end. I drew the silver envelope first and realised the mistake of the pen nib too close to the mat. So I had adjusted the purple pen so there was enough clearance when not in use. I even did a test draw and it wasn't catching where the silver pen had - I thought success, and stopped half way through. However, this little scrape was towards the end, so if I had pulled the pen up slightly it might not have happened.




I hope this has inspired you to attempt mail art and spice up your envelops. I know if I received an envelope through the post like this, I would have a smile on my face and look forward to opening it. Beats junk mail and bills any day!


Until next time,

Verity












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DESIGNS USED:

Simple floral - Rhonna Farrer, Design ID #153157
Floral Bunch - Rhonna Farrer, Design ID #151892


PRODUCTS USED:

 

Sunday, 18 February 2018

Sundays with Steph - It's all needles and pins (pens)!

Hello - and welcome to this weeks blog post!

So I've been using the regular cutting facility for a few weeks now and getting on quite well - with a little help from my friends (I'm sure that there is a song about that 😜) so I decided to try something new - pens!!!

So first things first break out the new set of glitter pens https://graphtecgb.co.uk/product/silhouette-sketch-pens-4-pen-pack/ I used the black one loaded it into my machine with some smooth white paper then I got busy choosing which design I was going to draw out.  I went for this one in the end https://www.silhouettedesignstore.com/view-shape/234160

I centred the design,



then ungrouped it to remove the arrows


I then sent this to my cameo to draw the image.

So just a word of warning try not to be a clever so and so (like me) and think that just because the Cameo has a spare holder, the pen automatically goes in there - it doesn't 😂 my lovely drawn design was now being cut - arghhhh!!

So remove the blade and replace with the pen - ta da!!















Sooooo that was ok, not too many mistakes and that started me thinking.....maybe I'd try something a little different.  I'd heard that people use their machines to puncture holes in so that they can sew the designs on to paper and what do you know, they were right!!  On the top left hand side of your design page you can alter the cut line to dashes (third one down) and it cuts tiny little slots in your paper that you can sew through. Genius!!

And here is the beginning of my sewing adventure :)

I'm off to a crop this weekend so I hope to update this before it goes live with the finished article - or if not it may be on Sunday afternoon!

Best wishes and happy scrapping

Steph x 

The finished article :-) Quite impressive x






Saturday, 17 February 2018

Alternative Uses for Rhinestone Function in Designer Edition Software - Part 2



Hello, hello - Karen here, back again with a second alternative use for the rhinestone feature in the Designer Edition software.

This idea came about as I had seen lots of pages, recently, using a template to make string art hearts.  I thought - that's something I could do on the Silhouette and once I decided to try it was super easy.


  • Choose a heart shape and size it to 10in x 10 in.

Open the Rhinestone panel.


Choose the outline option, change the size to 4 and the spacing to 1.1ins



Then you have your design ready to cut the holes and add the brads.


I have numbered the order in which I strung mine.


This technique could be used for all sorts of shapes.

Friday, 16 February 2018

Kids Artwork Jigsaw Puzzle


Make a Jigsaw Puzzle from your children's artwork. Designed by Janet Packer (Crafting Quine) for the Silhouette UK Blog.



Hello again.  Janet here with a fun idea for preserving your child's art work. I've included a tutorial for making a jigsaw puzzle from a hand drawn picture, one that's been photographed or scanned, and then saved on your computer.  This drawing was made by my daughter when she was at primary school and we love how it includes a beloved family pet.  It is a great way to preserve fond memories. The same method can be used for favourite photos too.


Make a Jigsaw Puzzle from your children's artwork. Designed by Janet Packer (Crafting Quine) for the Silhouette UK Blog.




What You'll Need

Silhouette Chipboard
Quality Printer Paper
Spray Adhesive
Strong Liquid Adhesive
Printer



How to Make a  Jigsaw Puzzle


STEP 1: Prepare the File

Open the puzzle file onto a new tab in the Silhouette software and group it (select all, right mouse click, Group).

Make a Jigsaw Puzzle from your children's artwork. Designed by Janet Packer (Crafting Quine) for the Silhouette UK Blog.


Shrink it to 200mm square (open Transform panel, in Scale tab change the dimensions, and click apply).

Make a Jigsaw Puzzle from your children's artwork. Designed by Janet Packer (Crafting Quine) for the Silhouette UK Blog.


Step 2: Bring in the Image

Select Merge, navigate to your saved image and select Open. Merging the file ensures the image opens in the same tab (File > Merge > navigate to picture > click Open).

Select the image and, using the same Scale tab again, reduce the size of the picture to a little bigger than the puzzle and send it to the back (select, right mouse click, click Send To Back).


Make a Jigsaw Puzzle from your children's artwork. Designed by Janet Packer (Crafting Quine) for the Silhouette UK Blog.

Fine tune the sizing (select one of the corner grab handles, and holding down the shift key, move the handle in or out until the picture is the size that you want it).



Step 3: Crop the Image 

Draw a rectangle of the exact dimensions of the puzzle, centre it on the puzzle, then move the puzzle away. Select the square, and the picture, and select Intersect.

Make a Jigsaw Puzzle from your children's artwork. Designed by Janet Packer (Crafting Quine) for the Silhouette UK Blog.


Bring back the puzzle and centre it with the cropped picture (select both, open the Transform panel, Align tab, click on the Centre icon).

Make a Jigsaw Puzzle from your children's artwork. Designed by Janet Packer (Crafting Quine) for the Silhouette UK Blog.


(Optional) Add text ensuring that the line colour is anything but red.


 Step 4: Prepare the Print & Cut

The Page Settings will depend on the size you have chosen for your puzzle, mine required A3 paper and an A3+ printer. If yours is smaller it will fit on A4 paper and can be printed on a regular-sized  printer. To find out about large sized Print & Cut refer to my earlier post.

Make a Jigsaw Puzzle from your children's artwork. Designed by Janet Packer (Crafting Quine) for the Silhouette UK Blog.


Step 5: Print the Puzzle

Print the puzzle onto printer paper and adhere the paper to a sheet of chipboard using spray adhesive (this ensures that there is glue over the entire back side of the image.


Step 6: Cut the Puzzle

Attach the the chipboard-backed image to a cutting mat and cut out the puzzle pieces, selecting Cut by Line, and choose to cut just the red lines.

Select the Chipboard cut settings, but do carry out a test cut first. I was able to reduce both the blade setting and force although I did have to carry out additional passes for the pieces to cut all the way through.

Make a Jigsaw Puzzle from your children's artwork. Designed by Janet Packer (Crafting Quine) for the Silhouette UK Blog.


Step 7: (Optional) Strengthen the Puzzle Pieces

If you would like a stronger puzzle, cut a second set of puzzle pieces from a blank piece of chipboard, and adhere the individual pieces from two sets together with strong liquid adhesive.



Step 8: (Optional) Make a Backboard and Frame

Design a frame to fit around the exterior of the puzzle (I used part of the Love Doodle Square Borders by Rivka Wilkins to decorate it). Insert an outline of the puzzle pieces in the interior. Carry out a Print & Cut, cutting the interior as well as the exterior of the frame. Cut a piece of backing board the same size as the exterior of the frame. Adhere the outline puzzle directly to the backing. Adhere the frame to a piece of chipboard cut to the same dimensions.


Make a Jigsaw Puzzle from your children's artwork. Designed by Janet Packer (Crafting Quine) for the Silhouette UK Blog.


This is a really fun way of preserving your child's artwork and fun activity to do with the kids, or as a gift for a child, or for grandparents. You could use the same technique to make the puzzle into a large-sized fridge magnet using Silhouette Printable Magnetic Paper.



Bye for now,




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DESIGNS USED:



PRODUCTS USED:

Thursday, 15 February 2018

Alternative Uses for Rhinestone Function in Designer Edition Software - Part 1



Hello, hello Karen here with an idea on using the rhinestone feature which is available in the Designer edition software.

I don't know about you but I have only made two or three things with rhinestones on so this little feature was mainly redundant.  I got to thinking and then got to playing as I thought that surely there must be something else that this function could be used for and I wondered if it could be used to drill holes for stitching and the answer is YES!


  • Select the design you want to make into a stitch design.  I chose a phrase to make a large scrapbook page title and made it 11 ins tall and 9.5 ins wide. 

  • The next step was to use the rhinestone feature to convert the lines into holes.

  • Then, I chose the effect which just outlines a shape, changed the size to 4 and the spacing to 0.05in.

  • You may have to 'tweek' the design a bit as some of the holes are too close together and some are too far apart.  You can do this by using the 'Release Rhinestones' button and moving them into the desired place as I have with my final design. 

As you can see I have also added a date, which I used a sketch pen to write.


So after a six hour marathon sewing session my page was ready to add my photo and embellishments.



Why don't you pop back on Saturday for Part 2 of Alternative Uses for Rhinestone Function.

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